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TEFL versus SIT-TESOL???
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Which is a better certification to have?
TEFL
44%
 44%  [ 4 ]
SIT-TESOL
55%
 55%  [ 5 ]
Total Votes : 9

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olapoland



Joined: 24 May 2004
Posts: 1
Location: California

PostPosted: Mon May 24, 2004 5:47 pm    Post subject: TEFL versus SIT-TESOL??? Reply with quote

What is the most accepted/useful ESL certification? Before I spend over $1000 on a course I wanted to know which is better to have? I would greatly appreciate any advice from experience. THANKS!!!
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treviteach



Joined: 30 May 2004
Posts: 4

PostPosted: Sun May 30, 2004 4:31 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Hello Ola,

Well first off when you refer to "TEFL" I assume you are referring to the numerous, generic "TEFL Certifications" available from any number of providers. If your comparing these homegrown certifications directly with the SIT TESOL Certification I would without a doubt choose SIT. My best advice when looking at this type of course is really dig deep into the course provider, their repuation, where are they recognized, what is their background in the field, etc.

If you ask these questions I think you will find the answer easier to come by.

- TT
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unionjack
Site Admin


Joined: 04 Jun 2004
Posts: 498
Location: UK

PostPosted: Fri Jun 04, 2004 11:40 pm    Post subject: ESL, TEFL Reply with quote

Ola

Do you want to improve your English qualifications by taking an ESL course or do you want an English teaching qualification TEFL?
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EFLtrainer



Joined: 06 Jul 2005
Posts: 17

PostPosted: Wed Jul 13, 2005 11:53 pm    Post subject: Re: TEFL versus SIT-TESOL??? Reply with quote

olapoland wrote:
What is the most accepted/useful ESL certification? Before I spend over $1000 on a course I wanted to know which is better to have? I would greatly appreciate any advice from experience. THANKS!!!


SIT has an excellent and longtime reputation as the best at what they do, but that is as an institution, not a TESOL course provider, per se. The downside is that, and I may be wrong, they are relatively new to the TESOL/TEFL course industry. Also, I looked over the franchising area of their site and had some concerns about the training of the trainers. CELTA and Trinity seem to have a more rigorous regimen, and TEFL International's is highly unpredictable.

I don't know about the lesser known places...
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teflintltrainer

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globaltefl



Joined: 23 Jul 2005
Posts: 1

PostPosted: Sat Jul 23, 2005 5:02 pm    Post subject: SIT TESOL Certificate Reply with quote

Just a quick correction on a previous post. SIT has been in the TESOL profession since 1969, when they first began offering the MAT ESOL degree, and it is one of the most established and well-respected in the profession.

There is no franchise per se. At present all trainers have MATs from SIT and generally a good deal of experience teaching, both abroad and in the US. As far as I know, most CELTA trainers do not have master's degrees.

It is also interesting to note that SIT and CELTA have a partnership and will be coming out with a new joint course in a year or so.

As for SIT TESOL versus TEFL, this is not a valid comparison. TEFL is simply an acronym meaning Teaching Engish a Foreign Language and does not refer to any one course, but is used by a multitude of courses, both good and not so good.

I hope this clarifies the issue.

Global TEFL
A non-profit organization that promotes teacher education
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EFLtrainer



Joined: 06 Jul 2005
Posts: 17

PostPosted: Sat Jul 23, 2005 6:06 pm    Post subject: Re: SIT TESOL Certificate Reply with quote

globaltefl wrote:
There is no franchise per se. At present all trainers have MATs from SIT and generally a good deal of experience teaching, both abroad and in the US. As far as I know, most CELTA trainers do not have master's degrees.


Thanks for the info. However, I was referring to info on the website that indicated that the process was to determine an area you wanted to establish a course - how is that not a franchise? But, splitting hairs - go through the cert course yourself, then go do it in the area you had chosen. This seems a little loose and the actual training to be a trainer seemed exacltly like TEFL International's: take the course, go be a trainer. I would be happy to be wrong on this count as I'd love to see the industry become more serious about actually training teachers.

Quote:
As for SIT TESOL versus TEFL, this is not a valid comparison. TEFL is simply an acronym meaning Teaching Engish a Foreign Language and does not refer to any one course, but is used by a multitude of courses, both good and not so good.


Actually, I was referring to *a* course, if your response was to my post.

Quote:
Global TEFL
A non-profit organization that promotes teacher education


I have a hard time with this *non-profit* designation. TEFL International is *non-profit*, yet is all about profit. What, exactly, does Global TEFL do to help the world with its profits? (And I do understand that non-profit does not actually mean charitable, but shouldn't it?)

EFLtrainer
www.geoctieis.com/killiankob
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teflintltrainer

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dreadnought



Joined: 13 Aug 2005
Posts: 1
Location: Bishkek, Kyrgyzstan

PostPosted: Sat Aug 13, 2005 5:28 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Quote:
Thanks for the info. However, I was referring to info on the website that indicated that the process was to determine an area you wanted to establish a course - how is that not a franchise? But, splitting hairs - go through the cert course yourself, then go do it in the area you had chosen. This seems a little loose and the actual training to be a trainer seemed exacltly like TEFL International's: take the course, go be a trainer. I would be happy to be wrong on this count as I'd love to see the industry become more serious about actually training teachers.


Having nearly completed the process of training up to be a SIT TESOL trainer, I can tell you quite categorically that it is extremely rigorous, and nothing at all like the TEFL International situation you describe. You firstly have to meet the stringent qualification requirements (I have twelve years experience, CELTA/DELTA and nearly finished my Masters), then you have to fill out a substantial application form and get several references. Once accepted, you have to complete a series of tasks (about 50 hours of work in total) before you can begin your apprenticeship. You then have to do two full courses under the supervision of a trainer of trainers. After each course you then have to submit a portfolio of work, including session plans, reflection papers, grading of students' papers etc which are then assessed. Only after all that and only after they've decided that you meet the requirements, do you get accreditation as a trainer.

I really wish it was as easy as doing the course and then becoming a trainer.... Wink
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camelcarl



Joined: 23 Jul 2005
Posts: 25

PostPosted: Sat Aug 13, 2005 9:28 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Hey Dreadnaught,

Good clarification there on the training...still seems to be a franchise though. I'm mean i'm sure people aren't opening up these courses for charity purposes...everyones got to make money somehow.

CC
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kris.licks



Joined: 13 Aug 2005
Posts: 4

PostPosted: Sat Aug 13, 2005 10:13 pm    Post subject: Only in it for the money Reply with quote

I mean which courses out there aren't out to make a buck? The fact is, those TESOL course outfits, Cambridge, British Council, "non-profits". Those guys are more money-minded than the language schools themselves. I mean they take in much more money, slave you much more. I think the best way to look at is since those TESL courses cost about 10x what the average language course costs, we can assume that the owners are 10x as ruthless, as a rule, on mistreating their employees, us poor teachers.

That is the harsh truth of the matter and nobody can tell me otherwise
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seeshore



Joined: 28 Jul 2005
Posts: 8

PostPosted: Sat Aug 13, 2005 10:23 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

amen brother...amen
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EFLtrainer



Joined: 06 Jul 2005
Posts: 17

PostPosted: Mon Aug 15, 2005 5:50 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

dreadnought wrote:
Having nearly completed the process of training up to be a SIT TESOL trainer, I can tell you quite categorically that it is extremely rigorous, and nothing at all like the TEFL International situation you describe. You firstly have to meet the stringent qualification requirements (I have twelve years experience, CELTA/DELTA and nearly finished my Masters), then you have to fill out a substantial application form and get several references. Once accepted, you have to complete a series of tasks (about 50 hours of work in total) before you can begin your apprenticeship. You then have to do two full courses under the supervision of a trainer of trainers. After each course you then have to submit a portfolio of work, including session plans, reflection papers, grading of students' papers etc which are then assessed. Only after all that and only after they've decided that you meet the requirements, do you get accreditation as a trainer.

I really wish it was as easy as doing the course and then becoming a trainer.... Wink


And I wish it wasn't. Thansk for clarifying the process. If potential trainees can't see in this the disparity in quality of trainers is important, or simply shoose to ignore it, they can only be looking for a resume filler.

EFLtrainer
www.geoctieis.com/killiankob
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EJW



Joined: 17 Aug 2005
Posts: 1

PostPosted: Wed Aug 17, 2005 7:48 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Good postings! I just wanted to make a comment about what some of you mentioned about "non-profit" meaning "charitable". As someone who has some bookkeeping background, I want to clarify that "non-profit" means exactly that: "not operated with the objective of making a profit." This does not mean "free" nor "charitable". It just means, at the end of the fiscal year, that incomes and expenses even out and that the organization does not make any money, ie. a profit. Hopefully it does not take a loss either, which is why they have to charge to cover their expenses, such as the cost of salaries, offices, equipment, etc. Unless they are getting financial help from some other source, these organizations are going to get money to cover costs through charging the participants in the programs. And that is YOU! Smile
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EFLtrainer



Joined: 06 Jul 2005
Posts: 17

PostPosted: Thu Aug 18, 2005 6:08 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

EJW wrote:
Good postings! I just wanted to make a comment about what some of you mentioned about "non-profit" meaning "charitable". As someone who has some bookkeeping background, I want to clarify that "non-profit" means exactly that: "not operated with the objective of making a profit."


Correct, but...

Quote:
"not operated with the objective of making a profit."


This is obviously not true of any privately held TESOL course provider, and certainly is not true of the company I have worked for.

Quote:
these organizations are going to get money to cover costs through charging the participants in the programs. And that is YOU! Smile


THAT certainly is true!
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teflintltrainer

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Wonder Bread



Joined: 02 Aug 2005
Posts: 10

PostPosted: Fri Aug 19, 2005 1:45 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

What you didn't point out that is "non-profits" generally out there in this field simply pay the big hanchos the big manjana, instead of declaring it as "profit" as with a so-called "private" organization you keep referring to. Let's call the kettle black here: "Private" can apply to "non-profit", I mean private means it's run some somebody not in the goverment. I think you're getting a little too eastern-block with your approach. Non-profits are by all means private, unless they are owned by the state.

But what i really wanted to say was that don't be fooled by the non-profit, really they are generally more dishonest than the guys that at least don't hide the fact that they want to maximize the profits by charging you a lot for the course, and paying the trainers jack. The non-profits use that label to appear to be worldly and "for the better good,' but then just pay themselves a big salary - which goes on the books Mr. Accountant as an expense - so the books balance, there is no profit left over, but the owners make out like bandits with the same cash. And don't be deceived, non-profits sure as all get at have owners just like your everyday language school from that analogy used above by a poster who pretty much hit the nail on the head.

Now what I'd really like to hear is about some non-profits, lang. school or course provider, who are indeed living up to the name. Can anybody make a case to that effect for some honest Adam Smith owners out there? Come on, show me some evidence on a non-profit with the top dawgs not paying themselves top dollar at the little guy's expense, I'd really like to believe they're out there

Peace, not war
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Lee Hobbs
Site Admin


Joined: 08 Dec 2005
Posts: 141
Location: TheGulfCoast

PostPosted: Sun Dec 11, 2005 7:37 am    Post subject: TEFL, SIT-TESOL, Which one do you have? Has it helped? Reply with quote



Quote:
Can I get a teaching position without the ESL certificate? Does anyone know of a decent organisation that would accept an educated but uncertified teacher?


Quote:
. . . I do not know which certification I should receive. I also do not know what programs are accredited or are actually accepted by employers . . .


Quote:
Considering that a lot of teachers enter the profession without *any* qualifications, any course is better than no course.


Forum folk,

ESL qualification prerequisites anyone Question

There's a lot of talk going on now in the various ESL forums on ESLemployment about what kind of academic degrees you might (or might not) need to qualify for employment at a respectable ESL school abroad (or, just get legal working papers).

On top of this, there is the age-old question of what type of ESL certification one should have, if any at all. The consensus seems to be that all of this depends on:

1. the individual country and its own set of laws and
2. the individual ESL school and how high (or low) its standards are

Over on ESL-Lesson-Plan, a decision has been made to take a poll and find out, once and for all, what the average ESL teacher today has under his or her belt when it comes to listing credentials on a vita or a job application form.

Since our readership is sizable, the results should prove to be interesting. I'd like to extend the survey to ESL Forum participants.

I've prepared a little survey on this subject. Don't worry, they are six easy multiple choice questions. If you have a moment to spare, please share you input on this anonymous poll. I'll collect the data and publish it in either a future blog post or in the next edition of ESL Instruct (or both).

The link to the poll is here (should open in a new window):

CLICK HERE TO TAKE SURVEY

As usual, thanks for your participation. After taking the survey, please feel free to leave a comment here on your thoughts about how "degreed" an ESL teacher ought to be, what it means to our profession when the standards are raised, and, besides actual teaching experience, which program(s) benefit both the ESL student and the skill-level of the ESL teacher the most?

Best, as ever,

Lee

http://www.esl-lesson-plan.com

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Lee's blog is still available, however, here: www.english-blog.com
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