ESL Jobs - ESL, EFL, TEFL, TESOL Teaching Jobs
  • FREE Weekly ESL Jobs
  • ESL, EFL, TESL, TEFL -- Get weekly updates of the Hottest New Jobs direct to your inbox as well as easily apply to new openings!
  • Enter your Email:

ESL Jobs Forum
"Where New and Seasoned ESL Professionals Come Together To Network . . . Share. Listen. Learn."

 FAQIndex    FAQFAQ   SearchSearch   MemberlistMemberlist   UsergroupsUsergroups      RegisterRegister 
 ProfileProfile   Log in to check your private messagesLog in to check your private messages   Log inLog in 

Papers for teaching in Spain

 
Post new topic   Reply to topic    ESL Jobs Forum Forum Index -> ESL in Western Europe
View previous topic :: View next topic  
Author Message
adam34235



Joined: 19 Jan 2006
Posts: 6

PostPosted: Sun Oct 18, 2009 3:24 am    Post subject: Papers for teaching in Spain Reply with quote

Hello:

I am looking into a teaching position in Spain. I find that most schools require EU papers or specific papers for Spain. I am not even clear on this.
Anyways, what are the "papers" I need in order to teach in Spain?
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Lexicon



Joined: 11 Sep 2006
Posts: 153
Location: New Orleans

PostPosted: Sun Oct 18, 2009 4:53 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

You have to be an EU citizen. So if you're American, Canadian, South African, Australian, or New Zealander, you're not going to get a job.

If someone's advertising otherwise, it's a scam.
_________________
The first step to teaching is realizing that you don't know nearly enough yourself.

My Blog: http://calleteach.wordpress.com
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail Visit poster's website AIM Address
Ekskalibur



Joined: 20 Dec 2009
Posts: 1

PostPosted: Sun Dec 20, 2009 9:42 pm    Post subject: Teaching in EU Reply with quote

For the most part Lexicon is correct; however, I had a flatmate that was from Toronto and she worked with no problem in Spain (Sevilla, to be exact). Remember that Canada is still part of the Commonwealth of England, so in her particular case she was legal to work in the Eu, to include Spain. Spain is quite difficult to get "legal" work there. I worked for a couple different language schools there and usually you do business English courses so it's not as hard to get work that way because you're not on the premises for the Caja to find you working illegally. I'm not saying it's right or wrong, I'm just telling you the facts.

Good luck finding work in Spain. Spain was one of my favoutite places to live! It's awesome. BTW: I'm American and that was in 2007.

Ciao
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Traveller



Joined: 20 Dec 2009
Posts: 2

PostPosted: Mon Dec 21, 2009 12:05 am    Post subject: Vaya tonteria! Reply with quote

Lexicon wrote:
You have to be an EU citizen. So if you're American, Canadian, South African, Australian, or New Zealander, you're not going to get a job.

If someone's advertising otherwise, it's a scam.


Sorry Lexicon, but what you say is absolutely NOT true.
If you get a job contract or an invitation and you can show that you will have enough "subsistence mediums" then you can work legally in Spain and almost in all EU countries.
And before you answer, may I remind you that we get every year, in Spain, around 100.000 new immigrants (mainly from Africa and South America) and not all of them are illegals.

I can't accept that someone from far away can come on here using words like "scam" and so on without having any evidence about such things.

My best wishes for Christmas and the New Year.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Traveller



Joined: 20 Dec 2009
Posts: 2

PostPosted: Mon Dec 21, 2009 12:06 am    Post subject: Links Reply with quote

The forum rules don't allow to show links in the first post, so here the links about work in EU:

Anyway, here we can see a couple of addresses that can make it clear:
http://www.anyworkanywhere.com/visaseupassport.html
http://www.academicjobseu.com/
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
trelea49



Joined: 21 Dec 2009
Posts: 2

PostPosted: Mon Dec 21, 2009 3:29 am    Post subject: Teaching in Spain Reply with quote

Hi Adam! I also disagree with Lexicon, being that I'm American and just finished teaching a year abroad in Spain. (The best time of my life by the way!) Although it can be difficult to just work at language schools, some will definitely extend a contract or an invite if they really like you and if you are certified. (I was lucky to find a language school which allowed me to work and then extended me a legal contract because I have a MS in TESOL) However, if you don't have a certification, Andalucia (Southern Spain-- land of sol!) has a grant for English Language Teaching Assistants. (auxiliares de conversacion). This is the program that I did along with teaching at the language school. The Andalucian government is currently pushing for a bilingual program in area schools in the region and they are paying native speakers to come and help get the programs up and running and provide English language assistance to the teachers and have a native presence in the classroom. It's a really great idea! You are offered a stipend of 700 euro a month, which is enough to live comfortably, but if you want to travel you will need to get some extra tutoring classes (which are easy to find by posting flyers!) I went through CIEE ----- *see other post for link* (go to the teach tab and find more info. They are accepting applications now). If you do this option you will have to pay CIEE some fees, but you will get a great orientation in Sevilla upon arrival and get to meet tons of other language assistants so you will have connections to enable you to travel for cheap. They also guide you in finding an apartment, etc. Or if you are more adventurous you can apply straight through the government and you're pretty much on your own for getting to your city, finding your way, etc. But the Andalucians are so nice and are mostly always wanting to help! Here is the link for the application straight through the gov't --- *see other post for link*

Its in Spanish but there are some English tabs too. I wish you the best of luck!!! Again, this was the most fantastic year of my life!!! Feel free to ask if you have any other questions! (Oh and by the way--- the ciee program guides you through the paperwork process where as the direct govt application just gives you the information to complete all on your own.) Best!
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
trelea49



Joined: 21 Dec 2009
Posts: 2

PostPosted: Mon Dec 21, 2009 3:31 am    Post subject: Links Reply with quote

Adam---

Here are the links I couldn't post in the first one!

CIEE--- http://www.ciee.org/teach/spain/index.html

Auxiliares de Conversacion Government Site----

http://www.mec.es/sgci/usa/en/programs/us_assistants/default.shtml


Good Luck!
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
elizabethrocki



Joined: 21 Dec 2009
Posts: 1

PostPosted: Mon Dec 21, 2009 7:21 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Hello,
I have just received an invitation to teach in Spain in one of the Academia de Idioma. It looks good but it will be my first trip and I am not sure what I should ask to make sure that it is legitimate. Thanks for any advice, Elizabeth
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail
saor



Joined: 13 Oct 2009
Posts: 5

PostPosted: Mon Dec 21, 2009 11:46 am    Post subject: work permit Reply with quote

A non EU person needs a work permit issued by the Spanish authorities to work in Spain. To get a work permit you need a job contract from a Spanish employer. Many, if not most non EU EFL teachers in Spain teach illegally. This is a similar situation to what happens worldwide. Teachers enter the country on a tourist visa, work illegally for say six to nine months then leave. Some but not all countries check if you overstay a tourist visa, this is the main problem you face.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
europal90



Joined: 12 Oct 2009
Posts: 4

PostPosted: Mon Dec 21, 2009 2:46 pm    Post subject: working in Spain Reply with quote

As regards working in Spain, I also have to agree with our friends who say that although Spain prefers EU passport holders, it's not always an absolute must. As my experience has proven, any legitimate school will gladly accept a well qualified and experienced native speaker of English and as many cases, including mine, ( I'm from Canada) have shown, they will even pay for the visa papers required to secure a good teacher for upwards of two or more years depending on the countries visa requirements and limitations. (normally 2 yrs, 3 yrs and then 5 yrs). My advice is: don't waste your time applying online, It doesn't work. You have to go in person, meet the other teachers, make an effort to chat with the head of studies and get to know him/her a little and ask what your options are as regards working in their school. Once they meet you they may be willing to bend the rules a bit and take you on. Most schools don't want to limit their prospects to only hiring from England. (The only "true" Native English speaking country in the EU".) They are interested in boasting about their teachers from many different parts of the world. I wish you all the best. Have a blast.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
annabelle



Joined: 23 Jan 2010
Posts: 1

PostPosted: Sat Jan 23, 2010 10:49 pm    Post subject: Getting a job in Spain nowadays is very difficult Reply with quote

Hello all,
I spent 3 months in Spain this summer completing a TESOL/TEFL course in Madrid and although the school where I completed my course referred me to most language academies in Madrid, I could not get a job during my stay. Most of the language academies were closed for the summer and were only interested in getting teachers from October onwards. Most of them also had a problem with the fact that I am not a EU-passport holder, although the school where I took the course told me that this was not going to be an issue for me as language academies in Madrid were 'desperate' for teachers.
I am not sure if I had a bad experience due to the current economic crisis in Spain; the fact that it was summertime or if it was because I am Australian. I have 2 degrees, plus the TEFL certification plus 1 year English teaching experience from abroad and I spent all summer in Spain just wasting my money in accommodation, food and barely going out because I was basically living off my savings. I spent over AUD$7,000 in the 3 months I was there and I struggled.
I heard of cases of Americans and Canadians who had stayed there illegally and that after 3 years, they would claim residency if they were 'Apadronados' for that period of time. This means that they got registered with the municipality or town hall with a lease contract of not less than 6 months in length and they kept on teaching English without a work permit for 3 years.
I was also told by the Head of Studies from one institution who wanted to hire me illegally that one of their American teachers had been caught by the Police in downtown Madrid and had been given a warning that he needed to leave the country within 3 months. He spent one night in jail; he then married his Spanish girlfriend and still had to struggle in getting a work permit even being married to a Spaniard! The Head of Studies from the Institution who interviewed me told me this in order to warn me about what could happen to me if I decided to stay in Spain illegally and she still offered me a job but from October onwards. Out of 10 schools who called for jobs in the 3 months I was there, only 2 had no problem with the fact that I wasn't a EU-passport holder.
That was my experience and I hope that it helps anybody who wishes to go to Spain to teach English.
Good luck!
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
jda



Joined: 11 Dec 2010
Posts: 13

PostPosted: Sat Jan 29, 2011 2:35 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Lexicon wrote:
You have to be an EU citizen. So if you're American, Canadian, South African, Australian, or New Zealander, you're not going to get a job.

If someone's advertising otherwise, it's a scam.


Then how did the many Americans I met in Spain get their job? There are plenty of opportunities available for non EU citizens including, 'Auxiliares de Conversacion.' That program sends around 1,000 Americans every year to teach in schools. This is definitely not a scam!

What I would suggest is to call the American English language schools, tell them your situation and ask about ways of how you can teach there. There are different ways to get a visa.

And then there is always the illegal option. All I have to say about this is that there are a lot of Americans teaching English without papers. Certain cities make this easier than others.
_________________
spoken English tips
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Visit poster's website
Display posts from previous:   
Post new topic   Reply to topic    ESL Jobs Forum Forum Index -> ESL in Western Europe All times are GMT + 1 Hour
Page 1 of 1

 
Jump to:  
You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot vote in polls in this forum

Protected by Anti-Spam ACP


Contact Us | About Us | ESL Jobs Newsletter | ESL Lesson Plan | ESL Online